Sub Tropical Produce – Fruits & Vegetables in Spanish


Time to have a healthy snack and learn the names of some fruits & vegetables in Spanish.  For some of us there are unfamiliar items at the produce stands that can be confusing.  Not to worry, we will translate some of the most common fruits & vegetables in Spain for you.  If it doesn’t look familiar, don’t be afraid to give something new a try.  You may just like it!

A full list of fruits & vegetables in Spanish! What's common, translated names, and a little info about it.   Don't be afraid to give something new a try.  You may just like it! Read more on Almunecarinfo.com

Fruits in Spanish

Many fruits and vegetables are locally grown in Costa Tropical, but the Mango, Avocado & Chirimoya fruits get top billing in Almuñécar.  There is even a Chirimoya festival every October!  First, we will list the English name and then the name of the produce in Spanish, italicized.  This is just what we have found to be the most common local fruits and vegetables in Costa Tropical.  If you have more you would like us to list, just send us a message and a little information about what you would like to see listed.

Costa Tropical Fruits

Avocado – Aguacate 

There are two types of avocado grown locally.  The Haas avocado is in season from November to January.  It has a thicker bumpier skin.  While the Avocado granel is available year-round and has the thinner lighter skin.  In the  Granada province, on the Costa Tropical, 20 million kilos of avocados are produced each year!  Overall, Spain produced more than 70,000 metric tons in the 2018-19 season.  You will find they are likely very affordable in comparison with the prices in your home country.  These are wonderful in salads and as a topper for your morning toast!

There are two types of avocado grown locally.  The Haas avocado is in season from November to January.  This has a thicker bumpier skin.  While the Avocado granel is available year-round and has the thinner lighter skin.  In the  Granada province, on the Costa Tropical, 20 million kilos of avocados are produced each year! 

Mango – Mango

Ah, the Spanish Mango!  The majority of the Spanish mango producers are based in Málaga (the region of the Axarquía), as well as in the Costa Tropical of Granada.  This is a delicious and sweet Spanish fruit and the main season is August through November.

Ah the Spanish Mango!  The majority of the Spanish mango producers are based in Malaga (the region of the Axarquía), as well as in the Costa Tropical of Granada.  

Custard Apple – Chirimoya

Chirimoyas are a popular fruit in Spain, mainly grown right here in the southern province of Granada, in Costa Tropical.  Chirimoyas are also called “cherimoyas” or Custard Apples in English and are a delicious tropical fruit.  They are native to South America (Peru, Bolivia, and Ecuador), but Spain has them too!  The main season is October through January.  Read more here.

Chirimoyas are grown on trees and are a green heart-shaped fruit, with bumps on the outside.  Once it is slightly soft to the touch, it is ripe and time to cut open.  Inside you will find a white, juicy flesh, with a soft custard-like texture and large black seeds.  Many people love them and they are full of health benefits too! 

Pomegranate – Granada

This is certainly a local treat, as our province shares the name of this fruit “Granada”.  The name pomegranate comes from medieval Latin pōmum “apple” and grānātum “seeded”.  It originated in the region of modern-day Iran to northern India and has been cultivated since ancient times throughout the Mediterranean region.  It was introduced into Spanish America in the late 16th century and into California by Spanish settlers in 1769.  The main season September to February in Spain.  There are yellow and red varieties, and if you want a sweeter pomegranate, definitely go for the red.

This is certainly a local treat, as our province shares the name of this fruit "Granada".  The name pomegranate come from medieval Latin pōmum "apple" and grānātum "seeded". 

Fig – Higo

The edible fruit consists of green skin that sometimes ripens toward purple or brown and the inside is a brownish-red.  Figs can be eaten fresh or dried and used in jam-making.  Also, they wonderful served on a salad or with cheese.  This sweet treat is grown locally and the main season is August through October.  Try out some of these recipes!

The edible fruit consists a green skin that sometimes ripens toward purple or brown and the inside is a brownish red.  Figs can be eaten fresh or dried, and used in jam-making.  Also they wonderful served on a salad or with cheese.  This sweet treat is grow locally and the main season is August through October.

Persimmon (caqui or kaki)

The persimmon is a sweet, slightly tangy fruit with a soft to occasionally fibrous texture.  They are full of antioxidants and can be very beneficial to your immune system.  The main season is in the Autumn.

The persimmon is a sweet, slightly tangy fruit with a soft to occasionally fibrous texture.  They are full of antioxidants and can be very beneficial to your immune system.  The main season is in the Autumn.

Loquat – Níspero

The loquat has high sugar, acid and pectin content and it great for making jams and jellies.  The fruits are the sweetest when soft and orange. The flavor is a mixture of peach, citrus, and mild mango.  The fruit begins to ripen during Spring to Summer depending on the temperature in the area.

The loquat has a high sugar, acid and pectin content and it great for making jams and jellies.  The fruits are the sweetest when soft and orange. The flavour is a mixture of peach, citrus and mild mango.   The fruit begins to ripen during Spring to Summer depending on the temperature in the area. 

Berries – Bayas (Seasonal)

  • Strawberries – Fresas (The local season is from February through April, any other time of year they are likely imported)
  • RaspberriesFrambuesas
  • BlueberriesArándanos
  • BlackberriesMoras

Berries - Bayas (Seasonal)

Melon – Melón

There are so many melons to choose from, which are all delicious!  The most common is likely the Piel de Sapo melon.  You will find that mixing melon with the delicious Spanish Jamón is quite the treat too.  Here is a recipe you may like to try.

There are so many melons to choose from, which are all delicious!  The most common is likely the Piel de Sapo melon.  You will find that mixing melon with the delicious Spanish Jamón is quite the treat too.

  • Melón – I believe two of the most common are the  “Santa Claus” and the “‘Piel de Sapo” melons.
    These are very sweet with a light green flesh and the seed area has an orange tinge. The names translate to Santa Claus “the Christmas melon” and the Piel de Sapo is “skin of the toad’,  which refers to the thick mottled green skin.
  • WatermelonSandia
  • Casaba – Casaba
  • Honeydew – Melón
  • CantaloupeCantalupo
  • There are so many more, so you will just need to try them all!

There are so many melons to choose from, which are all delicious!  The most common is likely the Piel de Sapo melon.  You will find that mixing melon with the delicious Spanish Jamón is quite the treat too.

Quince – Membrillo

Quince fruit is hard and bitter on its own, but is most commonly jellied or candied and served with Manchego cheese and it is amazing!  Of course, it’s the main ingredient in jelly-like Spanish membrillo too.

More Spanish Fruits!

Spanish fruits

Apple – Manzana

Banana – Banana or Platano

Cherry – Cereza

Cherry - Cereza

Grape – Uva

Grapes are produced all over Spain and the northern regions are best known for their wineries.  But Andalucia is coming up on the wine scene too and there are several wineries you can visit on a day trip from Almuñécar.  This is also the fruit best associated with the Spanish tradition on New Year’s Eve.  At the stroke of midnight, you should consume 12 grapes in the first minute.  This will bring you good luck and health in the new year.

Grape - Uva

Grapefruit – Pomelo

Guava – Guayaba

Guavas are grown commercially on the Costa del Sol in Málaga, being introduced in the mid-twentieth century.  Guavas are currently rising to the top, as being high-profit crops.  They are slowly taking over the traditional citrus and chirimoya crops.

Kiwi – Kiwi

Lemon – Limón

Lime – Lima

Nectarine – Nectarina 

Olive – Oliva

olives and olive oil

Orange – Naranja

Papaya – Papaya

Mouthwatering ripe papaya is so juicy, sweet and few trees can be found in Costa Tropical, but mainly in Málaga.  A large produce company, in Málaga and Almeria, is trying to popularize them in Europe.  This fruit contains papain, which aids in the digestive process, as well as vitamin C, high levels of fiber, lutein, folic acid, and antioxidants.  Moreover, it’s very light and every 100 grams only have 30 calories.

A mouthwatering ripe papaya is so juicy, sweet and few trees can be found in Costa Tropical, but mainly in Malaga.  A large produce company, in Malaga and Almeria, is trying to popularized them in Europe.  This fruit contains papain, which aids in the digestive process, as well as vitamin C, high levels of fibre, lutein, folic acid and antioxidants. Moreover, it's very light and every 100 grams only have 30 calories.

Peach – Melocotón

Pear – Pera

Pineapple – Piña

Plum – Ciruela

Prickly Pear – Higo chumbo

Tomato – Tomato 

As you can see, this isn’t an all-inclusive list of Spanish fruits, but it should get you started!

Fruit Tasting!

From September through May, you can enjoy a special fruit tasting with Finca San Ramon.  Look at our list of things to do in Almuñécar.

 


 

Vegetables in Spanish – Vegetales

Vegetables in Spanish - Vegetales

Among the European Union countries, Spain has the second-largest proportion of land devoted to agricultural purposes, only behind France.

Artichoke – Alcachofa

Beet – Remolacha

Broccoli – Brócoli

Cabbage – Col

Cauliflower – Coliflor

Carrot – Zanahoria

Celery – Apio

Cucumber – Pepino

Eggplant – Berenjena

This is a very popular dish or tapa, which is breaded, fried and served with molasses.  It is known as Berenjena con Miel (fried eggplant with honey), so give this recipe a try.

Eggplant - Berenjena

Leek – Puerro

Lettuce – Lechuga

Mushrooms – Champiñones or setas

Onions – Cebollas

Peppers – Pimientos

Peppers - Pimientos

Pumpkin – Calabaza

Radish – Rábano

Shallots – Chalotes

Spinach – Espinacas

Sweet potato – Batata (not to be confused with “Patata” which is just a regular potato)

Zucchini – Calabacín

fresh vegetables in spanish

There are plenty more fruits & vegetables in Spanish, but this list should get you started!

For more references check these out.


Buying Produce

Did you know that there are different procedures for buying produce?  Yep, it all depends on which of the Almuñécar markets you are making your purchase.

Tips for buying produce in Spain
Buying Produce in Spain Markets vs Grocery Stores. This is something most people wouldn't even think to learn before visiting Spain. It isn't complicated, but there is a system to buying produce in the Spanish Markets, depending on where your are. Read more on AlmunecarInfo.com

 


Almuñécar Costa Tropical

Read more about Almunecar and what it has to offer you as a tourist or a resident.  Come to the Costa Tropical!

Click here for Almuñécar holidays, ferias, fiestas, and festivals.

Some facts all about Almuñécar Spain A-Z, Let’s Learn A Little & Enjoy Almunecar.

El Tiempo en Almuñécar (The Weather in Almuñécar)

Popular Social Media Spots In Almuñécar & La Herradura.  Where are the best locations for those Instagram and Facebook photos?

Que ver en Almuñecar/ What to do in Almuñecar

Looking for things to do or what to see in town?  We have so many options for you, find out more! Things to do in Almunecar Spain. From Almunecar Beaches, to castles there is so much to see and do. Including local activities, day trips, outdoors, Almunecar beaches and more. Read more on www.AlmunecarInfo.com

 

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Heidi

View posts by Heidi
Heidi is passionate about travel (50+ countries) and loves experiencing the world with hubby Alan and their 2 kids. In Aug 2012, they left the “perfect American life”, quit their jobs, sold their belongings and moved to Almuñécar. She likes to share all of her favorites things about the area, as well as practical information too. You may also view their family travel blog, Wagoners Abroad, at https://wagonersabroad.com

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